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Florence or Copenhagen; a city comparison and tourism travel guide

Both Florence and Copenhagen are fantastic cities, but which is better for your city-break or holiday?

We understand your dilemma. There is a wealth of information about both cities, but little stating which is the better destination and more suited for your trip.
This website will provide our unbiased opinions, and hopefully help you to choose the best city to visit. The article is divided into the following sections, and can be jumped to using the underlined links:
1) Introductions -
2) City scores -
3) Which one should I, friends, or family visit? -
4) When to visit and weather -
5) Who is the city suited for? -
6) The perfect 48hours (with map) -
7) Tourism details (where to stay? airport details?)

Introduction to Copenhagen and Florence

There is a buzz going about Copenhagen. The city’s always had fascinating tourist attractions and a welcoming people, but now the city is flourishing and the artisan scene is blossoming. Once deprived areas are being transformed into creative hubs, while trendy bars and independent business are springing up throughout the city.

Copenhagen is a dynamic city, which effortlessly excels at tourism. There is a public transport that actually works, a rich diversity of cultural attractions, along with a distractive, quirky character. It is no secret that Copenhagen is expensive, but borne from this is a growing street food movement, and an attitude to savour and enjoy.

High-level summary Florence and Copenhagen

Summary
Which city would I go to? Florence
Which one would I recommend to my parents? Florence
Which location for my 19-year-old cousin? Florence (Copenhagen is too expensive for him!)
Which for my food obsessed friend? Florence
Note: The above comparison does not consider the weather, and assumes travel at the best time of year (which is detailed later in this article)

The following sections compare the two cities and considers; how long to spend in them, when to visit, and provides suggested 48hours in each city (along with an interactive map). The final section is tourism practicalities and includes which airport to fly into, what district to be based in and how best to explore the city. We hope that you find all of this information useful, in planning your next exciting trip.

Destination details

How long to spend in the city?

Florence is a compact city which can be seen within a stay of one day and night. This is usually extended by an additional day to visit the Uffizi and Accademia Galleries. In the peak season there are extremely long queues for the galleries and Duomo cathedral; to avoid wasting precious time, it is advisable to pre-purchase tickets start the day sightseeing very early (8am).

There are many good day trips from Florence, which are easily accessible by train, and include Siena, Lucca, and Arezzo. Florence may be a smaller city, but a fabulous one-week holiday could be had based here.

Copenhagen can be seen in two days of sightseeing. A third day provides time for a slower pace (and flexibility to avoid rain) along with a chance to explore the artisan districts (Vesterbro, Latin Quarter and Nørrebro) in great depth. Copenhagen is a very endearing city where staying longer is very tempting…
A popular day trip is to visit the castles of Frederiksborg and Kronborg. Malmö is on the opposite side of the Sound Estuary (the Öresund) and can also be visited as a day trip.

Copenhagen’s weather is not as dismal as most visitors initially presume, and not cold as the other Scandinavian countries it is often mentally lumped with. The summer will always provide the best weather, and this aligns with the peak season, late spring and autumn can also offer decent sightseeing weather. The winters are cool and wet, but as many of the city’s sights are indoors, it is still possible for a better value (relatively!) city-break.

The ideal time to visit Florence is from April to June or September and October; this is when there are fewer tourists, prices are slightly lower, and the weather is pleasant. Even though it is popular, we would discourage the summer as it will be very hot, crowded, and most expensive for flights and accommodation. Winters are cooler and possibly wet but have the lowest number of tourists. Early spring and late autumn and are ideal for a city break.

Florence is an amazing destination. The focus for a trip will always be around the renaissance historical sights, from the statue of David in the Accademia Gallery, Botticelli, Caravaggio paintings in the Uffizi, or the Duomo. Beyond this there is a delightful city, with classical Italian architecture and delicious Tuscan regional cuisine - also gelato originated from Florence!

Florence is not an overly expensive destination, is relatively safe and has a small city atmosphere. The only real negatives are the sheer number of tourists (and day-trippers) who visit during the peak season, which means hours can be wasted stood in queues. Florence is highly recommended.

There is a lot to love about Copenhagen, there are funky art installations, wonderful tourist attractions and a great vibe about the city. Copenhagen is a tolerant and inclusive city, which is popular with all ages, diversities and tourist types. .

The main consideration is the astronomical price of everything. For context, the price of a glass of large beer in a touristy bar, is around 60kr (€8/$9), is the same you could pay for a lunch in southern Europe. If you have the money or can budget well, you will adore Copenhagen.

48 hours in Florence

While sightseeing in Florence always aim to see the major sights as early in the day as possible, to try to avoid the awful queues. For the first morning visit the Duomo complex with the church, the Campanile di Giotto Tower and Museo dell'Opera di Santa Maria del Fiore. Next visit the Palazzo Vecchio palace and the pretty Piazza della Signoria.

In the afternoon visit the Galleria dell'Accademia, which the standout attraction will be the statue of David by Michelangelo (advisable pre-book tickets). For the latter part of the day cross the Ponte alle Grazie with it’s views the Arno River and head to the Abbazia di San Miniato al Monte church. For sunset climb to the Piazzale Michelangelo viewpoint, the most romantic place in the city. For dinner try the regional meal of Bistecca alla Fiorentina (Florentine steak).

david Michelangelo

The statue of David is regarded Michelangelo finest work

For the second day start early again and head to the Uffizi Gallery, with its extensive collection of renaissance art (Botticelli, Caravaggio Da Vinci, Michelangelo, and Titian). For the afternoon cross the Ponte Vecchio with its jewel shops and visit the Boboli Gardens. To end the day visit Forte di Belvedere.

Copenhagen offers so much for a fun-packed 48 hours. Below is an interactive tour map - day 1 is highlighted in green and day 2 in yellow.

Begin the first day in the Rådhuspladsen, and wander up the Strøget, a bustling shopping street, to the Latina Quarter. Next is the Nyhavn district, with its 17th-century canals and traditionally painted houses, a favourite with tourists. Departing from the docks in Nyhavn are canal boat tours.

For lunch head to the Bridge Street Kitchen for a popular street food market. Christiania is a unique bohemian commune which is worth visiting, but pushy drug dealers and influx of tourists slightly detracts from the original ideals. Afterwards, head to the Vor Frelsers Kirke church, the Christiansborg Slot palace and the Slotsholmen island district.
Tivoli park is one of the world’s oldest amusement parks, and an enjoyable location for early evening. For the later night spend time in the trendy Vesterbro district.

Latin Quarter Copenhagen

The side streets of the Latin Quarter (Latinerkvarteret) are a joy to explore

Start the second day in the magnificent Rosenborg Slot palace, which can easily take a couple of hours to explore. Crossing the river leads to the diverse Nørrebro district with the uber-cool Superkilen Park - great for your Instagram posts. For lunch, visit the Torvehallerne street food market.

In the afternoon head into the historic Frederiksstaden district, with the Amalienborg Palace, and the Frederiks Kirke church both beautiful examples of grand Rococo style.For a cultural end to the day visit the SMK museum (the Danish National Gallery) or the Nationalmuseet Museum.

When selecting a location to be based in Florence, it is very difficult to go wrong, the city is compact and walkable. You should also stay within the confines of the SS67 ring road, and all of the main historic sights are to the north of the Arno River. The San Marco district (north of the historic centre) tends to have more budget options, while Oltrarno (south of the river) tends to have a younger vibe with its lively nightlife and artisan scene. For a more authentic Italian experience head to the east of the city and the Santa Croce district.

Florence is best explored on foot, and there is rarely any need for public transport or taxis. The two train stations are conveniently close to the city centre and make public transport day trips easy.

The “Indre By” area of Copenhagen is the best location to be based in due to its central positioning, but it does sell out. The Vesterbro district is an up and coming area, which is trendy and a touch edgy. Frederiksstaden is a more refined area of the city and contains many of the smarter hotels. For a lively trip be based close to the Latin quarter.

There is excellent public transport but often hiring a bike is the easiest way to ravel around, as there are extensive cycle paths and the city is flat.
The currency used is the krone (dkk), which is pegged to the euro at €1=7.46dkk. You must exchange to krone, as Euro is rarely accepted, except in the airport.

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