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Rome or Madrid; a city comparison and tourism travel guide

This article will compare Rome and Madrid, for a city break or holiday.
We understand that so many travel guides and websites make every destination seem so amazing, but few actually say which one is better, and more suited for your style of holiday. This in-depth guide will provide our unbiased opinions and independent views, and hopefully help you to select your ideal city to visit.
The guide has the following sections:
1) City introductions -
2) City score charts -
3) Which one should I, friends, or family visit? -
4) When to visit and comparison weather charts -
5) Who is the city suited for? -
6) The perfect 48hours (with map) -
7) Tourism details (where to stay? airport details?)
Please click on the underlined link to be taken directly to that section.

Introduction to Madrid and Rome

No city can rival Rome’s historic and religious importance. The city is a living museum, with iconic landmarks and historic-monuments intern-connected by grand avenues and charming side streets. Rome may be historical, but is far from a stagnant relic, it is a vivacious and chaotic city, led primarily by emotions and the heart.

Rome has its flaws, brought on from years of austerity and political mismanagement, but if you are able to gloss over these failings and focus on the culture, cuisine and iconic monuments, you will adore your time in Rome.

High-level summary

Summary
Which city would I go to? Rome
Which one would I recommend to my parents? Rome
Which location for my 19-year-old cousin? Madrid
Which for my food obsessed friend? Rome
Note: The above comparison does not consider the weather, and assumes travel at the best time of year (which is detailed later in this article)

The following sections compare the two cities and considers; how long to spend in them, when to visit, and provides suggested 48hours in each city (along with an interactive map). The final section is tourism practicalities and includes which airport to fly into, what district to be based in and how best to explore the city. We hope that you find all of this information useful, in planning your next exciting trip.

Destination details

How long to spend in the city?

Considering the sheer number of outstanding tourist attractions, Rome can be seen within two days. Three days allows for a more enjoyable visit to Rome, with time to absorb the culture. There can be long queues for the Sistine Chapel and the Colosseum, so starting early in the day is essential for a two-day visit.

There are good day trips from Rome including the Roman ruins of Ostia Antica or the historic town Tivoli. Rome has excellent intercity trains, and it is possible to visit Florence or Naples, or even Pompeii (2 hours by train) as day trips.

For Madrid, the length of stay greatly depends on how much you want to devote to visit the three famed art galleries (Prado Museum, Thyssen-Bornemisza and Reina Sofía), or immerse into Spanish culture. The city can be seen in two days of sightseeing, and a third day is often given to the galleries.

There are many outstanding day trips from Madrid and a trip can be easily extended to 5 or 6 days. A selection of the best day trips includes the medieval town of Segovia, charming Toledo, and the magnificent El Escorial. Madrid makes for a good base from which to explore the region, and is served by inexpensive public transport

Most visitors head to Rome in the hot, humid and crowded summer months of July and August. Early spring or autumn are a much better time of year, and provides a much more agreeable climate, without the throngs of tourists. To truly avoid the crowds, consider November to March, but there is always the slight chance of rain and it can be chilly. Even if it does rain, head indoors for a long lunch.

The major consideration for Madrid, is to avoid August, when the entire city shuts down (most restaurants, cafes and independent shops) and everyone heads to the coastal towns. Late spring and early autumn (Jun/July and September) are the best seasons.
Madrid can be surprisingly chilly in the winter, but is comparatively dry to the rest of Europe. As Madrid is in the centre of the Iberian Peninsula it tends to get more extreme weather than the coastal cities.

Madrid is one of the finest cities in Europe. The city may not have the iconic monuments and attention-grabbing tourist attractions, but in reality, there is a lot to see during a city break.

Much of Madrid’s tourist literature focuses on the museums and galleries (which are world-class), but this should not deter you; this is a fun-loving city, which has the best nightlife in Europe. No matter your style of trip, there will be something to love about the Spanish capital.

Madrid excels as a long-stay destination, and if you are able to work here, the city offers perfect work/life balance.

Rome’s appeal is ageless and timeless. It is no matter if you are going there for the perfect Instagram post of the Colosseum or on a religious pilgrim to the Vatican, the city will not disappoint.

Sadly, the years of austerity and political mismanagement are starting to wear through Rome, with an unkept and unloved mentality decaying around the edges of the city.

Rome in 48 hours
Below is an interactive map for 48 hours in Rome; day 1 is highlighted in green and day 2 in yellow, with optional sights in grey.

Begin at the icon of Rome, the Colosseum, but also explore the Foro Romano with its many excellent Roman ruins. On the way to the historic centre of Rome passes the Vittorio Emanuele II Monument, with its amazing viewpoint. For the afternoon explore the charismatic centre of Rome, taking in the Piazza Navona, the Fontana di Trevi and Piazza Colonna and the Pantheon. For the evening head to the Trastevere district on the western banks of the Tiber, for bars, late food and lively experience.

Start early on the second day to avoid the queues for the Sistine Chapel and Saint Paul’s Basilica. From the Vatican City, follow the River Tiber past the Castel Sant'Angelo, Mausoleo di Augusto to the Piazza del Popolo. For the afternoon explore the Villa Borghese park, before heading down the Via del Babuino, past the Spanish steps and into the Trevi district for a delicious meal. Before finishing in Rome part take in the tradition of passeggiata, an evening stroll wearing your finest clothes.

Madrid
48 hours in Madrid is not just the sights but also the atmosphere of the city. Below is an interactive tour map - day 1 is highlighted in green and day 2 in yellow, with optional sights marked grey.

Begin in the Puerta del Sol, then wander through charming streets of the El Madrid de los Austrias, which is the oldest section of the city. This leads to the Palacio Real, surrounded by its formal gardens and the Catedral de la Almudena to the south.
For the last part of the day explore the La Latina district and have a delicious tapas meal at one of the restaurants along the Cava Alta or Cava Baja. La Latina boasts numerous bars and is always a great place to start a night in Madrid.

Gran Vía madrid

The Gran Vía is the bustling main avenue of Madrid

The morning of the second focuses on the three art-museums, the Prado Museum, Thyssen-Bornemisza and Reina Sofía. Close to the museums is the pretty the El Retiro Park.
For the afternoon head down the Gran Vía, the main shopping street of Madrid, and visit the Malasaña district, with its artisan vibe, independent shops and trendy nightlife. For sunset watch it at the Templo de Debod, and then head back to Malasaña for a memorable meal and evening.

For your first visit, you would want to be based in the Centro or Retiro districts, and this will limit accommodation options. If you do wish a more remote, budget option always ensure it is close to a metro station. While exploring Madrid, you will do a surprising amount of walking.

The wow you’re going to…… factor

 

Nightlife?

Madrid nightlife is legendary, it may start late but it will continue for as long as you are still standing. Madrid nightlife always has the perfect balance of Madrileños and foreigners, and the locals are generally social and fun. There are the artisan and fashionable bars of the Malasaña district or the mega clubs of Kapital or Barco. Popular nightlife districts include Lavapiés and La Latina. For something slightly different there a flamenco clubs and performances. Madrid’s nightlife is diverse, social and as wild as you want it, and certainly will not disappoint.

Being a cosmopolitan city, Rome obviously has good nightlife, but nightlife is never the main reason to visit the city. Trastevere is always an enjoyable area, with it’s vibrant mix of bars and late-night cafes. On the opposite side of the Tiber, the area around Campo De Fiori is popular with tourists and locals alike. Rome nightlife has a large focus on being seen, and looking your finest. Nothing summarises this more than the tradition of passeggiata, when in the early evening, all ages don their finest (or new clothes) to stroll through the historic centre drinking wine and socialising with one another.
Madrid score 5/5 - Rome score 3/5

Museums and galleries?
Foodie trip, regional cuisines and eating out

Madrid score 4.5/5

Solo travel

Madrid is a social and vibrant city, which generally safe and suitable for solo travellers. There are cases of pick-pockets and opportunistic thefts, but no more than in any large city. Madrid is an important business and cultural centre, which attracts numerous solo travellers, many who may not even class themselves as solo travellers, as they are travelling for work or business. The city is not unfamiliar to solo travellers, and there are always many about.

You have to see Rome at least once in your life and even if you have to go it solo travel then go for it. The city is safe and all of the major attractions are relatively close together. As Rome is a romantic city, with a passion for food and meals, eating out along can sometimes be made to feel a little awkward.
Madrid score 4/5 - Rome score 3/5

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